The Generosity Crisis

By Nathan Chappell, Brian Crimmins, and Michael Ashley
The Case for Radical Connection to Solve Humanity's Greatest Challenges

Progress. It is one of the defining expectations of the modern era. But are continued improvements to the human condition assured? What would happen if the only institutions explicitly committed to feeding, healing, sheltering, educating, enlightening and nurturing our communities went away?

In The Generosity Crisis: The Case for Radical Connection to Solve Humanity’s Greatest Challenges, authors Nathan Chappell, Brian Crimmins and Michael Ashley deliver a startling analysis of the changing nature of generosity in America and why its decline could herald the end of the modern non-profit. The demise of philanthropy is coming if we do not change course – in fewer than 50 years, we could be living in a world in which inequality has never been as stark or as dangerous.

The Generosity Crisis has been published with the explicit goal of inspiring a different future. In a world fractured by crises of generosity, reciprocity and love, what would it take to launch a return to humankind's inherent propensity toward interconnection?

The answer, argue Chappell, Crimmins and Ashley, lies in establishing radical connection – between us and the value-driven organizations that strive to improve life on Earth. They invite you to join an urgently needed conversation around generosity as an antidote to isolation and the requirement that technology be harnessed as the only scalable solution to reversing the generosity crisis by enabling radical connection; by inviting us to take society's most intractable problems personally.

As some of our most respected voices on corporate social responsibility, social impact, and AI’s place in philanthropy, Chappell, Crimmins and Ashley bring decades of experience working with the world’s most effective nonprofit and value-driven for-profit organizations – offering readers actionable insights from multiple vantage points.

Remarkable for the breadth and depth of its analysis, this ambitious book shows us that humanity's best days may very well lie ahead; but only if we’re willing to rethink everything we think we know about connection.

Articles

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“Ultimately, the potential for greater human and machine symbiosis portends a remarkable alliance. Science fiction movies such as 2001:

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Michael Ashley is a dynamic speaker who brings results for his audiences. Consider this testimonial from business coach Jay McDowell MBA: “I saw Michael Ashley give his workshop “How to Use Storytelling in your Sales Process.” It was very engaging, and it felt like something I could/should try in my next meeting. Over the next two weeks I closed 4 prospects using his process. Four for Four! In fourteen years of Business Coaching I have NEVER closed four consecutive business coaching prospects into clients. Never.